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Tag Archives: Heavy Duty Casters

Well, it finally happened: Despite our best efforts, the boys in the lab got a hold of the Transformers movies. Apparently someone was trying to melt them down in the incinerator and just left them there when it didn’t work. Idiot! You can’t destroy pure evil! And you certainly shouldn’t just leave it lying around!

Since we couldn’t have the boys making wheel golems that battled each other over ownership of the All-Cart, we compromised – they could build a workbench with hidden casters that could extend or retract.

Super heavy duty, retractable casters, and a shiny coat of paint. It’s so beautiful, even Michael Bay would think twice before blowing it up.

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Wheel and Caster is a locally owned business located in Spokane, Washington. We ship all over the country and strive to provide quick, helpful service. Wheel and Caster is a division of Norlift, Inc, which is also a pretty cool place. You can read more about it at the Norlift blog.

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If you’re like me, you often find yourself wondering about the nature of wheels and casters while sipping your morning Mt. Dew. You say I’m a strange fellow? You should get a load of the boys in the lab. But don’t mock the boys – after all, they just whipped up these helpful descriptions to aid you in choosing the right wheel for your project.

These are just some of the more common options – for a more complete breakdown of the wondrous possibilities on offer, head over to Wheel and Caster 101.

Pneumatic – This wheel provides a cushioned ride for delicate instruments and breakable items. the tube-type, pressurized tire combines shock absorption with quiet operation and easy rolling. Standard with ball bearings.

Mold-on Rubber – Cushioned rubber tread permanently vulcanized to a semi-steel core is recommended for quiet movement with heavy loads. Molded core provides added strength with a reinforced, double-thick hub. Vulcanized rubber-tread wheels are standard with roller bearings. Temperature operating range is -40 degrees F to +159 degrees F. Durometer rating is 75A.

Phenolic – Phenolic compound reinforced with macerated fabric makes a high-strength, high-impact wheel resistant to oil, gasoline, even dilute acids. Compression-molded under extreme pressure, these wheels gain a dense uniform consistency. Phenolic wheels are non-marking, non-conductive, and spark-proof. They are available with plain or roller bearings. Will not warp or swell in a temperature operating range of -40 degrees F to +300 degrees F. durometer is 75D.

Semi-Steel – Cast iron toughened with steel, this wheel has extremely high load ratings and exceptionally long wear life. It’s recommended for rough wood and concrete floors – a good choice for moving heavy loads in manufacturing and warehousing. Long-life features include a heavy tread and plain or roller bearings. Ideal in extreme operating temperature ranges of -40 degrees F to +800 degrees F with optional high temperature grease.

Wheel and Caster is a locally owned business located in Spokane, Washington. We ship all over the country and strive to provide quick, helpful service. Wheel and Caster is a division of Norlift, Inc, which is also a pretty cool place. You can read more about it at the Norlift blog.

When we last left our heroes, we’d just learned how to measure the height of a caster. I taught you this not because I fear you may not know how to operate a tape measure, but because I wanted to prove to you that I knew how to operate one. But now that we both know that we know what we both know that we know, we can move one to other things.

The second thing you’ll need to know before ordering your new casters is about how much weight you’re expecting them to hold up. If it’s chair casters, this is a fairly simple (though deeply embarrassing for those of us inflicted with an allergy to gyms) calculation to make: Of all the people how might realistically sit in the chair, which one is … erm … biggest boned?

If you’re building a cart or dolly, then perform a similar guesstimation. Moving a fridge? Rocks? Lumber? Baby seal pelts? (Don’t forget the extra weight added by shame and guilt!) A good rule of thumb is to add a couple hundred pounds margin on top of whatever you think the actual heaviest load might be.

Let’s say you’re building a cart. You work for the local zoo, and you’ve been tasked with the enviable job of moving the rare miniature legless elephants from their sleeping area to the display cages every morning. Each elephant weighs 1,000lbs. Assuming you’re building a fairly standard 4-caster dolly, you’ll divide 1,000lbs by 4 (as the weight will be distributed across each caster). Factoring in the rule of thumb I mentioned above, you’ll probably want four 300lb. capacity casters.

Other things to keep in mind: the compound the caster is made of and the diameter of the caster with both affect how easily the load will roll and what type of environment it will work best in (indoors on smooth cement, outdoors on gravel, in an airlock in zero gravity, on a Civil War reenactment battlefield littered with badly acted corpses, etc). In general, larger wheels tend to work better on rough surfaces, and harder wheels tend to handle heavier loads better.

Wheel and Caster is a locally owned business located in Spokane, Washington. We ship all over the country and strive to provide quick, helpful service. Wheel and Caster is a division of Norlift, Inc, which is also a pretty cool place. You can read more about it at the Norlift blog.